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*DISASTER PREP 4 PETS

 

DURING AND AFTER THE DISASTER
Emergency Preparedness Education Program
 
Getting Ready
Getting Connected
Getting Strong
 
Pets are family too!

Don't leave your pets out of your plans

dog with suitcase in mouth

One of the lessons learned from Hurricane Katrina was that many people did not evacuate because they did not know what to do with their pets. For many of us, our pets are an important part of our family. Leaving them behind in a disaster would be unthinkable. As responsible pet owners we need to think about how to take care of our animals when disaster strikes. The same advice for human preparedness goes for preparing for your pets. 

 

DISASTER
PREPAREDNESS
FOR PET OWNERS
 
During an earthquake:
If the ground starts shaking, do not try to hold
onto your pet during the shaking. Animals will
instinctively protect themselves and hide where
they are safe.
 
After a disaster:
Be patient with your pets after a disaster.
Pets get stressed just as people do and may
need to readjust.
Reintroduce food in small servings,
gradually working up to full portions if
animals have been without food for a
prolonged period of time.
Allow uninterrupted rest/sleep for all
animals to recover from the trauma and
stress.
Familiar scents and landmarks may have
changed, and this can confuse your
animals. Release cats, dogs, and other
small animals indoors only. They could
encounter dangerous wildlife and debris if
they are allowed outside unsupervised and
unrestrained.
If you have outdoor pets, you should
consider bringing them inside after an
earthquake. Keep them inside until the
threat of aftershock has disappeared and
your pet has had time to calm down.
Release birds and reptiles only if necessary
and only when they are calm and in an
enclosed room.
Remember, pets are not allowed in
shelters. If you must evacuate for a short
time, leave your pet in a secure place with
ample water and food. If possible, return
daily to check on your pet until you can
return to your home permanently.
Listen to the radio for information where
shelters will be set up and ready to open
in your area. This may take three or more
days depending on the extent of the
damage. That is why it is so important
to be ready to take care of yourself, your
family and your neighbors for a minimum
of three days!
Physically check animal control and
animal shelters DAILY for lost animals.
Post lost animal notices and notify local
veterinarians and your neighbors of any
lost animals (visit www.missingpet.net for
lost and found).
Seattle Emergency Preparedness
Education Program
Getting Ready
Getting Connected
Getting Strong
Seattle Office of Emergency Management
2320 4th Ave
Seattle, WA 98112
206-233-5076
www.seattle.gov/emergency_mgt
Seattle animal shelter
2061 15th Ave. West
Seattle, WA 98119
Customer service: 206-386-PETS
www.seattleanimalshelter.org
DURING AND AFTER THE DISASTER
Pets are family too!
PET PREPAREDNESS
All responsible pet owners need to think about
how they will take care of their animals when
disaster strikes. The same advice for human
preparedness goes for preparing for your pets.
Be prepared to take care of yourself, your family
(including pets) and your neighbors for a
minimum of three days without any help from
the City resources.
For health and space reasons, pets are not
allowed in public emergency shelters. However,
in most states, trained guide dogs for persons
with disabilities will be allowed to stay in
emergency shelters with their owners.
PETS ARE FAMILY TOO!
Make arrangements for your pets as part of
your household disaster planning. If you must
evacuate your home, it’s always best to take your
pets with you. If, as a last resort, you have to
leave your pets behind, make sure you have a
plan to ensure their care.
 
PET PREPAREDNESS CHECKLIST
Assemble a kit that is easy to carry and east
to get to! Prepare to be self-sufficient for a
minimum of three days, logner if possible.
o
Pet carrier or cage for each pet
o
Food/water with non-spill bowls
o
Manual can opener
o
Medication and dosing
o
Pet first-aid kit
o
Vaccination, medical records, and current
photo
o
You veterinarian’s information
o
Cat litter box and litter
o
Newspaper
o
Plastic bags for waste disposal
o
Paper towels
o
Disinfectant
o
Leash and collar/harness
o
Blankets
o
Toys and treats
Pet First Aid Kit
o
Large and small bandages
o
Scissors
o
Tweezers
o
Q-Tips
o
Antibiotic Ointment
o
Hydrogen Peroxide
o
Elastic tape
o
Eye wash (saline)
o
Ear cleaning solutions
o
K-Y Jelly
o
Make sure your pet’s ID tag is up to date
with accurate information.
o
Secure bird cages and fish tanks. They
can move and break during a disaster,
especially an earthquake. Secure fish tanks
with industrial strength Velcro and have
the tanks on low stands or tables. Tighten
the latch on your bird cage so that the
door cannot be shaken open easily.
When organizing your neighborhood
to help each other in disaster, include
pet preparedness and response in your
neighborhood plan. For more information
on organizing your neighborhood,
contact the Seattle Office of Emergency
Management at 206-233-5076.
BEFORE THE DISASTER
Store enough food and water to last a
minimum of three days, longer if possible.
Prepare an evacuation kit for your pet. The
kit should include:
An unbreakable dish
Medications and instructions (enough
for 7 to 10 days if possible)
A leash and pet carrier
Your pet’s veterinary records
For housing purposes, cat carriers should
be large enough to hold a small litter pan
and two small dishes and still allow your
cat enough room to lie down comfortably
or stand to use the litter pan. Dog kennels
or collapsible cages should be large enough
to hold two non-spill bowls and still allow
enough room for your dog to stand and
turn around. For added assurance, clearly
label each carrier with your identification
and contact information.
Consider having a permanent microchip
implanted in your pet; this ID cannot be
lost or removed.
Make arrangements with a neighbor or a
relative that lives nearby to care for your
pet in the event you are unable to return
home immediately following a disaster.
Identify hotels and motels nearby that
allow pets.
BEFORE THE DISASTER
 

   

 

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